Jared Kushner's security clearance restored

Jo Lloyd
May 24, 2018

Mr Kushner was given a wide brief in his role as a White House adviser despite a lack of political experience.

White House officials have blamed the delay in Kushner receiving his security clearance on administrative backlogs normal to a new administration, as well as the complicated nature of his application.

Jared Kushner, U.S. President Donald Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, finally has a permanent security clearance.

That's according to a person with knowledge of the decision but wasn't authorized to speak publicly about the matter.

That led to a White House policy overhaul in February that significantly downgraded access to sensitive information for Kushner and other Trump administration officials on interim clearances.

Kushner had reportedly been operating on an interim clearance for more than a year, while he managed a vast portfolio ranging from relations with Mexico to Middle East peace. After it became clear that Kushner had actually met with many foreign officials during the presidential campaign, however, he amended his form to reflect more than 100 contacts.

Lowell added that Kushner was not asked about his personal finances or his family's real estate business.

Kushner's attorney would not rule out that Mueller might ask Kushner for a third interview, though Lowell said it was unlikely.

Susan Walsh  AP
Susan Walsh AP

Lowell said Kushner a year ago became "one of the first to voluntarily cooperate with any investigation into the 2016 campaign and related topics", the daily reported.

"For that job, he would normally need top secret and SCI", Zaid said.

Some had expected Kushner might not receive a permanent clearance for the duration of Mueller's investigation.

Kushner's initial SF-86 form did not mention any foreign contacts, though he quickly supplemented it to indicate that he would provide that information.

Parts of the probe are related to Kushner's role during the campaign and transition, including contacts with Russians and his role in the early months of Trump's presidency.

Kushner had to file three updates to his national security questionnaire, a form that guides the Federal Bureau of Investigation background check and asks for information about a person's employment history, finances, family, travel and other matters.

But experts also pointed to more innocuous explanations, including that Kushner's extensive travel and overseas contacts, as well as his business interests, are more complex than many incoming government officials' and might have taken more time for the Federal Bureau of Investigation to explore.

Other reports by

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER